Main Idea and Details can be hard to teach! This activity has students sort sentences and use higher order thinking skills to determine the main idea and key details. There are ways to differentiate for multiple grade levels.


 Getting students to grasp the concept of main idea and details can be difficult. The idea behind this activity is for students to understand what it means for details to support a main idea. When they are given the sentences to the paragraph all mixed up and out of order, it requires them to think about which of the details supports another.
 

Are all of the other sentences about this one? Are these sentences related? What is the main idea the author is trying to tell me in this paragraph? This activity engages them in a higher order thinking task, and requires reasoning skills. You can do this activity with any paragraph of sentences by simply typing them up and giving them to students out of order. You could even write the sentences to the paragraph randomly on the board and have students recopy them as a paragraph that begins with the main idea. You can try the activity shown in the photographs for free. I also have included a response sheet so students can write and explain why one sentence is the main idea. The file also includes writing extension ideas for older students!

You can get this main idea and details sentence sort for FREE when you subscribe to my newsletter at the bottom of this post!



If you like it, be sure to check out this resource in my TpT store! It is a bundle of all my Main Idea & Details Sentence Sorts!
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Main-Idea-and-Details-Sentence-Sort-Using-Higher-Order-Thinking-Skills-4400806?utm_source=TITG%20Main%20Idea%20Details%20Subscriber%20Post&utm_campaign=Link%20to%20Main%20Idea%20Details%20Resource

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Reading Question Stems in the classroom. Learn how you can use them to keep your students accountable and support your instruction!
  Using reading questions stems to keep students accountable for their independent reading. These questions are aligned to standards to help you target specific skills.

There are many uses of reading question stems in the classroom. From independent reading, to teacher directed reading, to supporting parents, these stems are very versatile.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/2nd-Grade-Reading-Question-Stems-3703101https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/3rd-Grade-Reading-Question-Stems-3699737
There are many different ways you can use reading question stems in the classroom. They are a great way to make sure your students are accountable for that independent reading time.
Using reading questions stems to keep students accountable for their independent reading. These questions are aligned to standards to help you target specific skills.
You can cut apart the question stems and give them to students to think about as they are reading. This gives them a purpose as they are reading, instead of just flipping through a book and tossing it aside and grabbing another. Another idea is to have them at your guided reading table and use them as discussion starters.

Using reading questions stems to keep students accountable for their independent reading. These questions are aligned to standards to help you target specific skills.
You can also have students cut them apart, glue them in a notebook, and respond to them. They can turn their reading notebooks in to you as a form of accountability for their independent reading time. Some of the questions require a lengthier response, and it would not always be a good use of students' time to have them respond to more than one question. After all, the goal of independent reading time is for students to be reading. :) But, responding to one or two questions can be a good way for you to hold them accountable for their reading time, while also gauging their skills with a certain standard.

Using reading questions stems to keep students accountable for their independent reading. These questions are aligned to standards to help you target specific skills.



Teacher Directed Lessons


The reading question stems are also beneficial to you. During any read aloud, you can pull a page (or more) of question stems that pertain to the specific standard you are working on. This will help you guide your lesson and class discussion toward that skill. You can also leave a few pages of question stems along with some books in a sub bin and you are all set for that unexpected absence. 
 https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/2nd-Grade-Reading-Question-Stems-3703101     https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/3rd-Grade-Reading-Question-Stems-3699737


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Using reading questions stems to keep students accountable for their independent reading. These questions are aligned to standards to help you target specific skills.Using reading questions stems to keep students accountable for their independent reading. These questions are aligned to standards to help you target specific skills.


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