Fictional Narrative Writing Units (Grades 2-5)

This fictional narrative writing unit includes mentor text, posters, writing prompts, lesson plans, and activities for teaching personal narratives.  Includes rubrics, checklists, and more. Your students will learn about brainstorming topics, writing introductions, conclusions, and much more! Available for second grade, third grade, fourth grade, and fifth grade students.


When it comes to writing, there is so much we want (and need) to teach our students. However, we cannot focus on all of it all at once or we will cause our students to hate writing. I have broken these units down into easy to implement lesson plans and have included all of the materials you need.

Each Fictional Narrative Writing Unit (Grades 2-5) has 12 lessons. The lessons can be implemented at an easy pace---spread out over four weeks, or can be condensed to be taught in a shorter time period. Since there are twelve fictional narrative lessons, you have time to build in any of your own mini lessons you feel your class needs. (For instance, if you see your students are struggling with a particular skill, such as capitalizing proper nouns, you can spend a day practicing that skill without falling behind with the unit.)

These lessons are included:
1. Brainstorming Characters & Settings
2. Fictional Narrative Organizer
3. Setting the Scene
4. Introducing the Problem (Conflict for 4th & 5th Grade)
5.Sequential Unfolding of Events
6. Character Responds to Events
7. Elaborating on Character Response
8. Sense of Closure
9. Show, Don't Tell
10. Editing With a Partner
11. Revising & Revisiting the Rubric
12. Publishing

Fictional Narrative student friendly rubrics and checklists.

The units include a student friendly rubric as well as a checklist they can use as they write. They help keep students focused on the skills taught during the unit, without overwhelming them.

This fictional narrative writing unit includes mentor text, posters, writing prompts, lesson plans, and activities for teaching personal narratives.  Includes rubrics, checklists, and more. Your students will learn about brainstorming topics, writing introductions, conclusions, and much more! Available for second grade, third grade, fourth grade, and fifth grade students.

Posters are provided to help teach certain skills. You can print them and put them in students' writing notebooks. This allows them to reference them at any time.

This fictional narrative writing unit includes mentor text, posters, writing prompts, lesson plans, and activities for teaching personal narratives.  Includes rubrics, checklists, and more. Your students will learn about brainstorming topics, writing introductions, conclusions, and much more! Available for second grade, third grade, fourth grade, and fifth grade students.

FAQ:
I teach multiple grade levels. Are the units different?
The units are mostly similar, but include different mentor texts, and have different examples in the centers. There are a few other minor differences throughout the units that reflect grade level expectations.

Click the images below to see more & preview the fictional narrative units.


https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/2nd-Grade-Fictional-Narrative-Writing-Unit-W23-4518726?utm_source=TITGBlog%20Fictional%20Narrative%20Post&utm_campaign=2nd%20Grade%20Unit   https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/3rd-Grade-Fictional-Narrative-Writing-Unit-W33A-W33B-4518733?utm_source=TITGBlog%20Fictional%20Narrative%20Post&utm_campaign=3rd%20Grade%20Unit
 


https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/4th-Grade-Fictional-Narrative-Writing-Unit-W43A-W43B-4522208?utm_source=TITGBlog%20Fictional%20Narrative%20Post&utm_campaign=4th%20Grade%20Unit   https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/5th-Grade-Fictional-Narrative-Writing-Unit-W53A-W53B-4522209?utm_source=TITGBlog%20Fictional%20Narrative%20Post&utm_campaign=5th%20Grade%20Unit


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    This personal narrative writing unit includes mentor text, posters, writing prompts, lesson plans, and activities for teaching personal narratives.  Includes rubrics, checklists, and more. Your students will learn about brainstorming topics, writing introductions, conclusions, and much more! Available for second grade, third grade, fourth grade, and fifth grade students.

    When it comes to writing, there is so much we want (and need) to teach our students. However, we cannot focus on all of it all at once or we will cause our students to hate writing. I have broken these units down into easy to implement lesson plans and have included all of the materials you need.

    Each Personal Narrative Writing Unit (Grades 2-5) has 12 lessons. The lessons can be implemented at an easy pace---spread out over four weeks, or can be condensed to be taught in a shorter time period. Since there are twelve personal narrative lessons, you have time to build in any of your own mini lessons you feel your class needs. (For instance, if you see your students are struggling with a particular skill, such as capitalizing proper nouns, you can spend a day practicing that skill without falling behind with the unit.)

    These lessons are included:
    1. Brainstorming Topics
    2. Picking a Small Moment
    3. Remembering Details
    4. Writing a Skeleton Outline
    5. Developing a Strong Introduction
    6. Writing the First Draft
    7. Writing as a Paragraph
    8. Adding Details (Concrete Details for 4th and 5th Grade)
    9. Writing a Conclusion
    10. Editing With a Partner
    11. Revising & Revisiting the Rubric
    12. Publishing

    Personal Narrative student friendly rubrics and checklists.
    The units include a student friendly rubric as well as a checklist they can use as they write. They help keep students focused on the skills taught during the unit, without overwhelming them.

    This personal narrative writing unit includes mentor text, posters, writing prompts, lesson plans, and activities for teaching personal narratives.  Includes rubrics, checklists, and more. Your students will learn about brainstorming topics, writing introductions, conclusions, and much more! Available for second grade, third grade, fourth grade, and fifth grade students.
    Posters are provided to help teach certain skills. You can print them and put them in students' writing notebooks. This allows them to reference them at any time.

    This personal narrative writing unit includes mentor text, posters, writing prompts, lesson plans, and activities for teaching personal narratives.  Includes rubrics, checklists, and more. Your students will learn about brainstorming topics, writing introductions, conclusions, and much more! Available for second grade, third grade, fourth grade, and fifth grade students.
    FAQ:
    I teach multiple grade levels. Are the units different?
    The units are mostly similar, but include different mentor texts, and have different examples in the centers. There are a few other minor differences throughout the units that reflect grade level expectations.

    Click the images below to see more & preview the personal narrative units.

     2nd Grade Personal Narrative Writing Unit  3rd Grade Personal Narrative Writing Unit


    4th Grade Personal Narrative Writing Unit  5th Grade Personal Narrative Writing Unit

    You may also be interested in 

    Want a main idea and details freebie?

    Subscribe to our email list!

      Choose Your Grade Level(s)

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      Unsubscribe at any time.

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      It can happen to any of us. Spring fever mixed with exhaustion mixed with a challenging class can lead to a lot of frustration and teacher burn out. What do you do when you are at your wit’s end before the year’s end? Here are some tips for trying to stay sane the rest of the year.

      1. Bring candy!

      Before you stop and say your class doesn’t deserve candy and it will only hype them up, here are two things to consider. A child with a lollipop in their mouth is a child who is not talking. Also—you don’t have to give candy to the entire class. When you see a student doing something you like, ANYTHING AT ALL, give them some candy. The rest of the class will take notice and will try to figure out what they can do to impress you. Dum dums are cheap and a great candy to use.

      2. Take them outside.

      Seriously—whatever you’re doing---just take it outside. Fresh air is so good for everyone—including you. When you feel yourself getting frustrated or losing control of your chatty class, just take them outside. Sit on the sidewalk for your math lesson. Take books for silent reading outside. Whatever you are working on! Just grab it and get out there. At least for fifteen minutes.

      3. Set a goal with a reward.

      Turn whatever your class is really struggling with into a goal. I like to make smart goals with my class. I use some chart paper to write out our goal. Then we discuss how to meet the goal, behaviors that will get in the way of us meeting our goal, and a reward for meeting it. Set a timeline and then check in daily. Depending on your class you might need a short timeline, such as one week. Here’s an example:

      4. Do something different for the day.

      Escape rooms, Comprehension Quests, science experiments, STEM challenge, classroom transformations, watch an educational video, a fun class read aloud are all ways to combat frustration by trying do something different. Sometimes a fun activity is just what everyone needs to get refocused.

      5. Team up with a younger/older class.

      If you teach upper grades, partner up with a lower grades teacher and set up reading buddies. Invite their classroom to your classroom and partner up students and have them read together. Compliment the younger students on their behavior. Encourage your older students to be role models.

      If you have tried some of these tips and are still feeling burned out and frustrated, consider taking a mental health day or two. (Attach them to the weekend for the maximum benefit!) It will do you a lot of good. Remember—you can’t pour from an empty cup.



      Want more ideas? Check out my blog post about 25 Ways You Can Have Fun With Your Students.

      What tips do you have for teachers who are feeling burned out?

      Tips for teachers who are feeling burned out and frustrated before the end of the year.

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